Writing journey

Hello March, Where Did February Go?

 

 

March has arrived. The daffodils are blooming and there are signs of green on the hedgerows. Looking back it has been more than a month since my last proper post. I know February  is a short month but the speed it flew by was ridiculous. The last few weeks have been devoted to self-care because I discovered ignoring tingling in your fingers and arms, which began during NaNoWriMo, was not a good idea. It only leads to your arms feeling like you are attached to an electricity pylon every time you pick up a pen or type. Prevention is better than cure. Has it enforced abstinence from writing helped? Not at all, when dystonia likes to cause problems it does not relent easily. Not being able to type on demand is frustrating because I have been trapped in an endless scenario of perfectly worded sentences flowing in my head without a release except for a few unsatisfactory notes. It is true you don’t realise the joy of something until it is gone. Writing group meetings and cake have also been skipped. I have not been a happy writer.

In desperation Dragon Anywhere, the voice recognition app was tried again. My first attempt of using it was discussed here. The short story dictated was encouragingly accurate. Thanks to some wonderful people who I will be forever grateful, the full version of Dragon has flown on to my laptop. Words have been added to my MS word count;  a new way of writing has begun. The software needs training, laptop teething problems need solving and new neural pathways need to be formed but I have renewed determination to finish both my WIPs. Dystonia will not win.

Current Word Counts

The Ellfanian Journals: 48, 106

Willow’s Tale: 62,999

How has your month been?

Happy writing!

Love

Kate Kenzie's Blog

 

 

 

writing with a chronic illness
Writing journey

Writing With Chronic Illness – Madeleine Dyer’s advice

 

 

Today I am sharing a wonderful guest post written by Madeleine Dyer, author of Untamed, for the Book Lovers Blog. As a writer with a chronic illness her advice is invaluable. I wish I had read it earlier so I would not have beaten myself up so much for struggling to write after an epic November and times fatigue takes over so no words are added to my WIP. I am terrible at comparing myself to other writers, they achieve more than I despite working full time, and looking after young children but I need to remember having a chronic illness can be a full time job and if I don’t practise self care nothing will be achieved.

 

 

In this month’s Writing Magazine a reader wrote into the helpline section for advice on writing with chronic fatigue. Her friends suggested maybe she should stop writing. I hope she continues to write because it helps with mental health and is a wonderful form of escapism. I also hope she finds her tribe to help her on her writing journey as I have. The writing community on social media especially Twitter and FaceBook is strong and mainly supportive. Many writers have health conditions which impact their lives and are willing to share tips and advice. I may work on my WIP and stories alone but writing is no longer an insular hobby. There is always someone to talk to, bounce ideas off or laugh with online. I am grateful for Turtlewriters on Twitter whose quotes and encouragement always help on bad days and the Fiction Cafe Writers. If it was not for them I would not have known about the RNA and the New Writers Scheme.

Writers can be found using the following hashtags #spooniewriters #writingcommunity #FictionCafeWriters #turtlewriters #5amwritersclub (If you are awake then)

If you have a chronic illness how do pace yourself with writing or do you have any tips? Feel free to share below.

Thank you Madeline for sharing your thoughts.

Love

Kate Kenzie's Blog

 

bookloversblog

Hi guys! I’m so excited about today’s post, because I actually didn’t write it (except this introduction)! As you can see from the title at the top, this is my first ever guest post for BookLoversBlog, a super exciting step for me and one that I hope can continue because I love getting to connect with other bloggers and writers and have them share their experiences, there is such a wide world of writers out there with different experiences to mine and I want to make sure that is reflected in this feature. 

Which brings me quite nicely onto today’s topic. Madeline Dyer is a YA writer, who has several chronic illnesses, so when she suggested writing a guest post about her experiences of writing with chronic illness, I thought it was a great idea. I hope that any of my followers who are also writers with chronic illness find…

View original post 1,396 more words

All about Books, Writing journey

The Pigeonhole: A New Reading Experience

I recently signed up to The Pigeonhole, described on the website as a book club in your pocket. It offers a selection of new releases from top publishers and classics. The new Sophie Kinsella book is an option which I am looking forward to if I get chosen to read it.  The books  are released in sections and you read along with other readers. More on how it works can be found here

The Pigeonhole a new reading experience
First stave of The Flower Girls

I saw an advert for it on social media and not only did the blurb of The Flower Girls by Alice Clark-Platts look good, the promise of a free book drew me in.  I am on a strict book budget this year. The more I read about the idea of the business the more I realised it could also help with my aim of reading more classic books. The big tomes, even on Kindle, are daunting but this way the book is broken down into staves or instalments. It reminded me of the Dickensian scenes in The man who invented Christmas where readers eagerly wait for the next part of the story out side the book shop. If it was good enough then, maybe the updated version will be good now.

I started reading The Flower Girls this week and so far I am enjoying the experience. As an insomniac it is exciting to receive the next part at midnight. It adds to the suspense of the thriller because you are left dangling mid story everyday and you are eager to know more. On the flip side, this could be frustrating depending on your outlook but the whole book is available to binge read a month once all the staves have been sent out or those on the read at leisure bookshelf can be read quickly. With crime or suspense novels, I also have a bad habit of reading the last page to discover who did it or who is alive, this curbs that temptation.

Alongside the story, there are options to interact with readers – share opinions of characters or scenes and writing style. I think this will come into its own with the classic books but I am enjoying the Q and A with the author which is also available.

One bonus I was not expecting was that as a procrastinator with words to write, this way of reading increases my productivity because I can not fall into the trap of reading just one more page or chapter. I am reluctant to start new book to read concurrently so it is a win-win situation.

Have you tried it? Let me know your thoughts below.

Love

Writing journey

Romance and writing is in the air

This year has begun with exciting news; I have been given a funded place on the New Writers Scheme with the Romantic Novelists’ Association. I can’t believe it and keep having to read the confirmation email to remind myself it is real. A big goofy grin appeared when I read the membership pack signed by Katie Fforde – yes, the Katie Fforde whose books line my mum-in-laws bookcase after I have read them – the Queen of Romance novels. I do not know who sponsored me, but I am very grateful. This chance feels like a big step in making my writing more than words on my screen and into a reality where others may read them. Last years’ luck of winning NaNoWriMo coaching gave me a confidence kick and a chunk of a WIP which has a romantic thread suitable for the RNA which enabled me to apply. I think the Gratitude Jar I started last week will be full of good memories by the end of 2019.

A jar full of memories

Nerves have kicked in. I doubt finances or health will allow me to join many events they offer but one event I would love to attend is the writing conference with workshops and talks. Fancy me being in a room of authors, editors and publishers. It is mind-blowing. I have highlighted it on my wish list. I just need the rail companies to sort themselves out, become co-ordinated with their times and change the rules to allow a small scooter on board so I can get there.

Thank you to Fiction Cafe Writers and Viola Bleu for telling me about the scheme.

Time to get writing as I have a novel to finish – gulp and a new adventure to begin.

Love

Kate Kenzie's Blog

Bye bye 2018 and hello 2019
Just life, Writing journey

Bye Bye 2018, Hello to a new writing year

After a very quiet Christmas, 2019 is insight and it is time to say goodbye to 2018. This year has been emotionally difficult but I have survived thanks to my writing. I am looking forward to starting a fresh page in the chapter of my life.

Farewell to my 2018 goals

Looking at the plans I made in January’s post there are some which will roll over into 2019.

  • I am still disorganised, with notes in different places but they are more contained and with a new planner  I am hopeful I can change.
  •  the first draft  for The Elfaenian Journals has not been finished because I got sidelined by Willow’s story. On the plus side,  it does not hide in a dusty file on my PC forgotten but always in my thoughts. By writing Willow’s world, it is evolving too.
  • a visit to Whitby for a research and chips is still needed

But I did achieve some.

 

  • I met up with the delightful Jennifer Gilmour for a hot chocolate after speaking to her online.
  • I have written more book reviews on From Under The Duvet – Books, Cards and a Wobbly Life, the new name for Duvet Dweller Books and made sure I added them on Goodreads and Amazon.
  • I have read books on writing and learnt lots from talking to the writing community on Twitter and Facebook

Other things I did this year which surprised me were:

  •  winning books for my book shelf and TBR in Twitter competitions
  • starting a new project with my favourite character so far Willow Anderson
  • completing NaNoWriMo thanks to winning coaching with the lovely Megg Geri

NaNo-2018-Writer-Twitter-Header.png

The aim for 2019 is simple –  write, read and enjoy.

Happy New Year.

Love

Kate Kenzie's Blog

 

P.S Percy is still alive

Discovering Charles Dickens
All about Books, Just life, Writing journey

Discovering Charles Dickens at Christmas

I love A Christmas Carol and part of the joy of the run up to Christmas is reading taking my copy off my forever shelf for its annual read as well as binge watching the movies from Disney’s cartoon starring Jim Carey, the Alastair Sims to the best version The Muppet’s Christmas Carol. This year I had the luck of reading Miss Marley by Vanessa Lafaye which is a beautiful read and complements the original perfectly. It is a warm, heartbreaking tale but has thread of hope throughout. It will be added to collection to read every year as will the film The Man Who invented Christmas.

Have you seen it?

I love it for the festive and book theme, the era and acting but mainly because it gives a glimpse into the creative mind of Charles Dickens. It tells the tale of how under pressure to produce a book readers will love he produced A Christmas Carol in only six weeks. I am sure it skims over the negative aspects of his personality to produce a high energy fantasy with an insight into the writer’s mind when they suffer writer’s block, find inspiration and how they act when characters appear.

It also shows how he decided to self publish and his battle with plagiarism which are relevant topics for today’s writer.  I wonder what his tweets would say if he was in the situation today.

As many of you know I am lot a great fan of classic books but this and Miss Marley have encouraged me to find out more on this enigmatic man beyond snippets I have picked up along the way – I doubt Dr Who Christmas special from a few years ago is the most reliable source of information. The book the film is based on by Les Standiford is on my TBR for next December and I am also going to  attempt to read at least one Charles Dickens novel next year. Maybe then, I will not feel as much of a dunce at writing group when they discuss literature. Any recommendations would be great.

I hope you had a lovely Christmas

Love

Kate Kenzie's Blog